Writing Remotely About A Remote Location

2014-02-27 18:24:25.000 – Mike Dorfman,  Weather Observer

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It is so easy to sit downstairs in our living room and completely forget we’re living on top of a mountain. The occasional rumble of the wind or shaking of our stove’s ventilation shaft is a gentle reminder that we are extremely isolated in an extreme environment. In case of an emergency, a snow cat rescue can be as much as 6 hours away, so we must rely on our own legs to get down the mountain.

Although the mountain is physically isolated from the rest of the world, we are very well connected when it comes to communication. As an isolated weather station, we have connected to other remote locations around the world through our Polycom network, giving distance learning programs to students of all ages. If you’re interested in setting up a program with the Mount Washington Observatory, we have a variety of programs to choose from, or we can even customize a program to fit your needs. Contact Michelle Cruz (mcruz@mountwashington.org) for more information on our programs!

Normally, I would be finishing up my day on the summit right now, but unfortunately I’m instead sitting back at home with an ice-pack on my knee and crutches sitting next to me. I love the summit, but isolation is the name of the game. If I’m not able to self-evacuate, I simply can’t do my job in its normal location. Hopefully I’ll be back on my feet (and back on the summit) soon!

 

Mike Dorfman,  Weather Observer

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