An undercast morning gives us a brief break from the fog.

2009-05-30 11:44:34.000 – Scott Wehrwein,  Summit Intern

View to the Northeast

Undercast! In addition to the joy of being able to see further than 100 feet, which we hadn’t since we got here on Wednesday, I got the extra thrill of my first real undercast viewed from solid ground this morning. I had seen a layer of clouds below me from an airplane, but it’s different to be standing on a land mass that rises up through the clouds. Watching the clouds tumbling over the Northern Presidentials and slowly shifting their shape and position could be compared to floating on an ocean of clouds.

While the nice view out the window may have distracted me from my work at times this morning, it certainly reminded me just how excited I am to be spending my summer up here. One of the coolest things about being an intern on the summit is that things like taking pictures of awesome views and cool clouds are actually part of the job. We’ve since moved back into the fog, but it was good to get a nice breath of fresh, fog-free air and some great views of interesting clouds.

 

Scott Wehrwein,  Summit Intern

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