Hailstone Ice Cream

2009-05-31 09:14:34.000 – Amy Terborg,  Summit Intern

Aftermath of the Hailstorm

Yesterday was my first chance to see a thunderstorm from the summit. We were literally inside the storm! One minute it was raining the next there was lima bean seed sized hail bouncing off the side of the tower. It was an amazing sight to see as the hail piled up all around the summit.

The fun didn’t end there though. Unbeknownst to me there was an ice cream maker ball downstairs in the kitchen. Stacey decided we should make good use of the piles of hail sitting around so she pulled it out and then we (Stacey, Scott, and I) ran outside to shovel some into the neon green ball (don’t worry, we waited until the storm had passed). After that we had to add the rest of the ingredients using what we had downstairs. Because we didn’t have an actual recipe we pretty much just put in random quantities of things until it looked like the right color.

Then came the mixing, which was hard work. According to the instructions you’re supposed to toss this big green ball around. However, after a few throws (one of which I did drop) we decided it wasn’t the best idea due to the proximity of the mercury thermometers. So, instead we decided to test out our soccer skills and just kicked it around for a good twenty minutes. Then we shoved into the freezer until after dinner and had some pretty good chocolate chip ice cream for dessert.

So, if you ever get bored after a hailstorm and you’re a complete and total weather nerd (like me), it’s a very entertaining thing to try!

 

Amy Terborg,  Summit Intern

Overview of Lapse Rate Research

May 20th, 2024|0 Comments

Overview of Lapse Rate Research By Karl Philippoff As a weather observer and research specialist on top of Mount Washington, in addition to my usual observer duties such as taking hourly observations, releasing forecasts,

Deadline Driven: The 12-Hour Shifts that Power Weather Forecasting from the Northeast’s Highest Peak

May 9th, 2024|Comments Off on Deadline Driven: The 12-Hour Shifts that Power Weather Forecasting from the Northeast’s Highest Peak

Deadline Driven: The 12-Hour Shifts that Power Weather Forecasting from the Northeast's Highest Peak By Wendy Almeida  As a new member of the Mount Washington Observatory team, I wanted to gain a deeper understanding

Find Older Posts