Having a bad day? Fly a kite!

2012-04-06 17:03:13.000 – Brian Fitzgerald,  Summit Intern

An afternoon kite flight on the observation deck.

It’s hard to complain about your job when you live atop one of the most spectacular mountains in the country and get to experience the raw intensity of mother nature so regularly just outside your door- yet it’s been a quiet first couple days on our shift, with few visitors, and only four of us (including one member/volunteer) occupying the now roomy observatory. So, needless to say, things can get a little monotonous, especially when it’s the third day in a row in the clouds with nothing but white rime-covered rocks to peer at every now and again. These situations usually don’t last long, mostly due to the variability of mountain weather and our moods. Luckily for me, I remembered to bring up a present from our member/volunteers on our last shift: a kite. I’ll admit, it’s been a while since I’ve flown a kite, and after this afternoon’s experience (in light 30mph winds), I had to question why. So for anyone down in the valley who might be in a funk today, here’s some friendly advice:

take a break and fly a kite!

 

Brian Fitzgerald,  Summit Intern

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