I Like the Sun

2010-12-24 17:31:42.000 – Mike Finnegan,  IT Observer

Knapper Takes in the Sunset

Today has been a fine day filled with fine views. This morning I awoke before the sun and completed my first observation under the soft blue light of a newly waning moon. By the next observation, the sun was rising over the Atlantic, casting soft pink color on the tower with an undercast below and the moon above, enjoying the beginning of the day as well. As the sun rose a bit higher, the color of the alpineglow intensified, casting its friendly light on the northern presidentials and on Franconia ridge, which was just keeping it’s head above the clouds. I could even see a glimmering gem of a mountain far on the horizon, my home mountain of Jay Peak!

After completing my last few hours of observations, I decided it would be a good idea to get outside for a bit since sunset is at 4:16 in the afternoon and I would have to have the forecast done as well by 5 pm. One of our volunteers, John, and I set off to hike over towards Clay. The hike was great with fine conditions for crampons, stiff windslab in some places and scoured to ice in others, with occasional drifts. I was also happy to see the Great Gulf filling in nicely for riding later this winter! We made it back to the summit with plenty of time for forecasting and more importantly, sunset, the other side of the tower receiving the warm light this time. The wind by this time had begun to pick up and with it began blowing snow, making it pretty, but a bit chilly. If tomorrow’s weather is any better than today’s, it is going to be quite the Christmas present for up here!

 

Mike Finnegan,  IT Observer

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