It Was A Cold And Windy Night…

2013-08-14 23:19:19.000 – Ryan Knapp,  Weather Observer/Meteorologist

The Rock Pile is experiencing a cold and windy night with temperatures currently at 37F and winds currently averaging 60mph with gusts past 70mph (and since everyone always asks, the wind chill currently feels like 20F on exposed skin). Temperatures are expected to nudge a bit further south overnight, possibly putting us near freezing by morning with winds climbing a bit more. Earlier in the day, forecast models were even hinting at possible snow flurries, but as of now, Doppler radar is pretty bare, with nothing on the horizon. However, we may see some morning glaze or rime ice if conditions set up just right; but we’ll see, the night is still young.

Now I know 37F isn’t that cold by Mount Washington standards and winds of 60 mph aren’t that high either, but it still takes some getting used after getting used to the mild warmth and calm of summer the valley was providing towards the end of our days off. So the shorts are tucked away as I find myself dusting off our warm EMS winter gear. Luckily though, this current cold blast is going to be short lived. Looking at the weather maps for our shift week ahead, we will be heading into more normalized weather after tonight. So, we just need to get past “Hump Day/Night” to get to the better weather that is in store. However, today did provide a quick reminder that summer is fleeting and that winter isn’t that far off. So I recommend getting out there and enjoying it while you still can (just be sure to check the forecast so you stay safe and prepared)!

 

Ryan Knapp,  Weather Observer/Meteorologist

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