let it snow!

2008-12-11 14:34:20.000 – Stacey Kawecki,  Observer

Let it snow!

Snow is on the way! An area of low pressure fueled by the Gulf of Mexico’s warm air is heading northeast. Loaded with moisture, it should pass to the south and east of the higher summits, keeping us in the cooler portion of the storm, the warm front not quite reaching us. This means snow, and lots of it! In fact, the National Weather Service was calling for up to 14 inches in the mountains.

Does that mean 14 inches of fresh powder for the summit crew’s personal recreational use? Not necessarily. After the past few days of warm temperatures, the snow melted into slush, which froze quickly as a cold front crossed the area yesterday. Bullet proof ice is not the stickiest ground, and chances are that a lot of the snow will blow off the summit, into the ravines. Already, what little snow has fallen is being picked up by relatively light winds and swirling around the summit. Also, the density of the snow will affect how much sticks to the summit: a wet snow will stick to the ice a lot better than super light and powdery snow. So, what we’re hoping for is the snow to start off heavy and wet, set a nice base, then light and powdery as the low continues into the Canadian Maritimes.

After spending two and half weeks in Hawaii, I am more than ready to strap on my board and take a run (or a fall) down one of those happy bunny trails (not found on the summit of Mount Washington) come Wednesday!

 

Stacey Kawecki,  Observer

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