Loving the cold!

2010-12-09 16:22:19.000 – Brian Clark,  Observer and Meteorologist

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If it hasn’t been obvious from comments you read here or by looking at the current conditions or webcams, let me assure you, winter has set in on the summit. Finally. In fact as I write this, the air temperature is at a chilly -10 F. Last night’s low was -11 F, the coldest reading so far this winter season. Yesterday’s average temperature of -7 F was 19 degrees below the average for December 8.

Somewhat at these temperatures, but more so at temperatures below -20 F, the first breath you take after walking outside has a very distinct feeling; it feels somewhat labored, kind of like trying to breath with your head hanging out of a car window. As crazy as this will sounds to some of you out there (my girlfriend included), I love that feeling. I also love the sound the the snow and rime makes beneath my feet at these temperatures. You know, that very distinct crunching noise.

Tonight may be even colder than last night, but then we will see temperatures rise into the weekend as a big storm approaches. Exactly what type of precipitation we see from this system is still a bit up in the air (no pun intended), but it does at least appear that it will be all frozen or freezing precipitation here on the summit. Personally, I’m hoping that the center of the storm heads a little further east than currently forecasted, so that we end up with all snow!

 

Brian Clark,  Observer and Meteorologist

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