Mild Weather

2011-01-29 22:46:28.000 – David Quigley,  Summit Intern

NULL

There are strenuous days and there are relaxing days. I would peg today as relaxing. Each morning I fulfill my intern duty of shoveling the exits. I never know what to expect when opening the front door. The situation awaiting me ranges from deep, wind blown drifts to yellow snow from hikers disobeying the sign asking them not to relieve themselves in the entrance. Today, however, I was happy to see about an inch of incredibly light snow. Shoveling the entrance took just a few minutes. When I came back inside, I noticed a few brooms inside and regretted that I had not taken the rare opportunity to sweep instead of shovel.

I spent the most of the day rewriting the software which interfaces with the summit’s weather instruments. The system collects, processes, displays, and logs the data coming in from instruments. This afternoon I took a break to take my first fog obs under the guidance of Stacy. This was a momentous occasion. For the record, here are the results from my first ever observation.

Time: 13:55 ZULUTemperature: 5.9 degrees FWind Direction: WestMinutes of Sunshine: 0Sky Cover: 8/8Visibility: 1/16 milesWeather: Light Snow & Fog

Other than that the mild weather has made for a rather un-noteworthy day. The sky cleared up at nigh, which ended up being starry and beautiful. Marty had a rare clumsy moment. He fell off a cabinet, bounced off the phone, and hit the floor rather hard. Understandably, he was very embarrassed. I am hoping for more exciting weather soon.

 

David Quigley,  Summit Intern

Overview of Lapse Rate Research

May 20th, 2024|0 Comments

Overview of Lapse Rate Research By Karl Philippoff As a weather observer and research specialist on top of Mount Washington, in addition to my usual observer duties such as taking hourly observations, releasing forecasts,

Deadline Driven: The 12-Hour Shifts that Power Weather Forecasting from the Northeast’s Highest Peak

May 9th, 2024|Comments Off on Deadline Driven: The 12-Hour Shifts that Power Weather Forecasting from the Northeast’s Highest Peak

Deadline Driven: The 12-Hour Shifts that Power Weather Forecasting from the Northeast's Highest Peak By Wendy Almeida  As a new member of the Mount Washington Observatory team, I wanted to gain a deeper understanding

Find Older Posts