Monday

2007-06-25 23:09:49.000 – Lynn Metcalf,  Summit Intern

Tanning Obs-style

“It’s Monday.” I groaned tiredly this morning as I imagine countless other people did. The unique part of my morning vocalization is what I lamented next, “I can’t believe the week is almost over.” I would not have thought a month ago that life rotating around Wednesdays would be so very different from life based on the standard work week. There is just something slightly disconcerting about the fact that those oh-so-dreaded Mondays are now part of my “weekend” on my off shift weeks.

Of course, getting used to a slightly shifted work week is nothing, I imagine, compared to getting acclimated to nocturnal life. This is where I give laudation to our dedicated night observers. Currently, our awesome night observer Ryan is training the observatory’s new observer Zach (also awesome) about the finer points of the tad-bit less glamorous shift. Here at the observatory the night observers are the unsung heroes, toiling tirelessly through the night to ensure that we uphold our long history of ‘round the clock observations.

We have been working very hard at the observatory this week, but decided we could spare some time to sun bathe in the intermittent fog. Zach, Cathy, and I rolled out our towels and threw on our shades. The 50 degree weather actually felt nice after the last few days of snow and ice. Cathy and I have been really busy as of late, in addition to our project work and other observatory duties, we sewed a vest for Nin so that he can match us. Also, today is our volunteer Jeff’s birthday. Cathy and I made celebratory oreo-peanut-butter-pudding pies!

 

Lynn Metcalf,  Summit Intern

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