More Signs of Spring

2012-04-19 16:33:42.000 – Brian Fitzgerald,  Summit Intern

The Cog train with Mount Clay in the background.

Here we are in mid April and the signs of spring are abound above treeline. Yesterday (Wednesday) on shift-change day our upcoming shift managed the first drive all the way up the mountain in our unchained 4×4 van. It’s incredible that just over a week ago our shift left the summit and more than a foot of snow behind.Today’s high temperatures in the lower 40s coupled with light winds and a strong April sun continued a string of pleasant weather up here on the Rockpile, encouraging many hikers to put themselves to the test hiking to the summit. Another sign of spring, aside from the increase in hikers and melting patches of snow on the higher summits was the sighting of the Cog slowly chugging up the mountain, checking and repairing the rail ahead of another busy season. Just think, in only a month the summit will be transitioning from its sleepy-time visitation of just a hardy few to welcoming countless visitors as summer draws near. So up here at the summit we’ll be sure to enjoy the last of the peace and quiet while anticipating summer excitement and warmth.

 

Brian Fitzgerald,  Summit Intern

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