New Snow!

2006-10-26 13:10:03.000 – Bryan Farr,  Summit Intern

Front Door Drifts…

I think someone forgot to tell Mother Nature that we are only one month into autumn, as winter is in full force on the summit of Mount Washington this morning. Snow drifts reaching ten feet have been created by blowing snow and howling winds which yesterday peaked at 94 mph. A white hurricane continued to blow this morning with northwest winds nearing 80 mph causing pure whiteout conditions. We have picked up over 8 inches of snow, bringing our monthly total to 27.8 inches. Now if last year never happened, we would be nearing a monthly record set in 1969, with 34.4 inches. However last year shattered that record with 78.9 inches falling.

With all of this snow comes the work of shoveling the entry way and observation platform and of course the art of ascending snow drifts, ok, that part is more play as seen in today’s pictures. The last time I saw anything like this was during the Blizzard of 1993. You just cannot help yourself to run and jump into these monstrous heaps which definitely brings back your childhood youth in an instant. Mind you I was dressed in three layers, gloves, two hats, goggles, snow pants and thermal boots, all typical and necessary gear for this time of year, and for anyone who chooses to climb to the peak.

We will definitely be on the verge of the second snowiest October on record as this weekend approaches. A large storm currently over Oklahoma, with enhanced moisture from Pacific Hurricane Paul, will track over us during the day on Saturday. We will be battling some warm air, but several more inches of snow are likely to fall before we close out October. Keep in mind the average October snowfall for Mt. Washington is just shy of 14 inches.

For the sake of comparison, here’s another view of the Yankee drift, which you can contrast with comment photos embedded on Saturday!

 

Bryan Farr,  Summit Intern

Overview of Lapse Rate Research

May 20th, 2024|0 Comments

Overview of Lapse Rate Research By Karl Philippoff As a weather observer and research specialist on top of Mount Washington, in addition to my usual observer duties such as taking hourly observations, releasing forecasts,

Deadline Driven: The 12-Hour Shifts that Power Weather Forecasting from the Northeast’s Highest Peak

May 9th, 2024|Comments Off on Deadline Driven: The 12-Hour Shifts that Power Weather Forecasting from the Northeast’s Highest Peak

Deadline Driven: The 12-Hour Shifts that Power Weather Forecasting from the Northeast's Highest Peak By Wendy Almeida  As a new member of the Mount Washington Observatory team, I wanted to gain a deeper understanding

Find Older Posts