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2010-08-29 14:37:08.000 – Stacey Kawecki,  Observer and Meteorologist

Mansfield Sunset

There’s a lot of hot air blowing around up here today, literally. Earlier today, with temperature at a balmy 54 degrees, we reached a peak gust of 76 mph! That officially exceeds hurricane force. It is unusual to have winds so strong and temperatures so warm. It is exceptional fun to go out on the deck and play in the wind and not get cold. It’s also pretty hilarious to watch those who are unfamiliar with strong winds squeal in delight (and maybe a little fright) as the gusts push them around the observation deck. As the tourists tumble about the deck like crunchy leaves on a stiff breeze, we seasoned observers stride around like we’re made of stone (well, I still stumble, but that’s normal for me) with the sling psychrometer, looking cool as can be.

The culprit (or the provider) of these winds is, of course, weather. High pressure is currently parked over the Carolinas, and low pressure to our north has created a rather strong pressure gradient, which was the reason for the high winds today. However, the center of the high will creep northward, and winds will very gradually diminish. Temperatures will soar into the 60s (a heat wave!) and we might even get to enjoy some temperate star gazing as the skies above remain clear. It gets even better too! The weather is supposed to stay like this straight through Thursday (though I suspect that Wednesday and Thursday will feel downright tropical)! Warm and breezy.

Even though we are now being graced with unseasonably warm temperatures, fall is just around the corner as August fades into September. That familiar scent of change is definitely in the air.

 

Stacey Kawecki,  Observer and Meteorologist

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