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2010-07-06 17:27:00.000 – Sabrina Lomans,  Summit Intern

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Recently, I have been trying to extend my running habit that I have on my off weeks and incorporate it into my weeks on the summit as well. So for, this has been quite a challenge. With the combination of the variance of morning weather conditions in addition to the steep climb up the Auto Road, it has proved to be an interesting experience.

This morning proven less than ideal running conditions. The summit was in a thick fog with winds at about 40 MPH. Even as I just walk out the door I know that this is going to be brutal because the fog was so dense that you could only see about 3 ft in front of you. The part that the wind was the worst was when I ran by Cow Pasture because it was blowing perpendicular to the Auto Road. It was so intense that instead of running in a straight line, I was getting pushed somewhat diagonally.

Fortunately, on the way back up, the wind was to my back. This was actually helpful in that it pushed me up the steep hills. Even though only I am only running a few miles of the road, I have realized that there is no such thing as a nice, easy jog up here.

 

Sabrina Lomans,  Summit Intern

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