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2011-06-30 16:05:29.000 – Peter Strand,  Summit Intern

Our shift might need to be called the “Windy Shift” for the remainder of the summer. Since I arrive in May, our shift has hit 74 mph winds (hurricane force) every week. We even gusted to over 100 mph the other week. Meanwhile the other shift seems to experience less windy conditions, their peak wind gust last week was only 49 mph.

As a side note, did you know that the “Windy City” isn’t named after its high winds? Chicago doesn’t even crack the list of top 10 U.S. windiest cities. Its average wind speed of 10.3 mph can’t match Dodge City, Kansas, which has an average speed of 14 mph. Of course neither of these locations comes close to Mt. Washington’s staggering 35 mph average, but we aren’t exactly a city. After all, there’s only one permanent resident up here, Marty the cat! Nope, the “Windy City” historically refers to long-winded politicians. As for which crew is more “windy” in that sense, the jury is still out on that one. As for windiness related to H.A.G., well… never mind.

The good news for those who plan to be outside in the near future is that it appears high pressure will be making its way to the summit soon. Expect some milder temperatures, lower winds and possibly even some sun. Don’t forget to include a trip to the summit of Mt Washington and a tour of the Observatory in your 4th of July plans!

 

Peter Strand,  Summit Intern

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