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2006-10-15 05:52:36.000 – Ken Rancourt,  Meteorologist

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If it is not winter up here ‘climatologically’, it certain is by the looks of things. Last night we were below freezing, and in the fog, so lots of Rime Ice built up on everything. Mother Nature also gave us some light snow, snow grains, and with the higher winds after midnight, we also saw some blowing snow.

The Cog Railway and Auto Road are still open, weather dependent of course, and the State is finishing up with their Gift Shop and Food Concession. With early morning icing it takes a while to get the Auto Road open for private cars, but many made it to the top yesterday as the relatively strong sunshine melted all that had accumulated earlier.

This is certainly the time of year for hikers to be cautious: at Pinkham this morning (the location from which many hikers begin their ascent on the mountain) the temperature was a mild 38 degrees. With a 20 degree drop in temperature as you get higher (our temperature at the same observing time was a measured 18) it can get cold rather quickly. Our wind chill temperature is at -6F —- and that is not a number to ignore.

 

Ken Rancourt,  Meteorologist

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