NULL

2006-04-01 05:19:52.000 – Nin,  Summit Cat

The Ravine from Wildcat…

A discovery by an eminent botanist (who wishes to remain nameless) on a recent Observatory EduTrip may have a significant impact on spring skiing in Tuckerman Ravine this year.

A little-known and endangered plant, previously known only to exist in far, far arctic regions of Canada, has thought to have sprouted in the exact center of the ‘Left Gully’ in the Ravine. Pending confirmation of this possibly very rare plant, a number of organizations involved environmental protection are poised to call for the limitation of human activity within the area of the popular skiing run.

The plant, known to the indigenous populations of the Far North as Sloof Lirpa, is most peculiar in that it requires perfect corn snow to propagate. Once established, the plant can grow to heights of 7 feet or more in just days, and is by far the largest alpine or arctic plant yet known. Its blooms are nothing short of spectacular, with pungent purple flowers covering the remarkable stalks. A skier at Wildcat yesterday was even able to spot them with early blooms from miles away, and snapped this picture.

Hikers and skiers are still permitted to come and view the plant,though should do so only from a distance, both to protect the plant, and because Northern lore tells of this plant potentially being carnivorous. However, despite its size, there is no fully reliable record of humans ever being consumed by it.

Despite the impact that this discovery will likely have on skiing LeftGully this season, visitors will find many other areas of the Ravinestill ski-able, of course with the usual spring hazards.

For additional background on today’s report, please consult your calendar!
April Fools! – The Summit Crew

 

Nin,  Summit Cat

Overview of Lapse Rate Research

May 20th, 2024|0 Comments

Overview of Lapse Rate Research By Karl Philippoff As a weather observer and research specialist on top of Mount Washington, in addition to my usual observer duties such as taking hourly observations, releasing forecasts,

Deadline Driven: The 12-Hour Shifts that Power Weather Forecasting from the Northeast’s Highest Peak

May 9th, 2024|Comments Off on Deadline Driven: The 12-Hour Shifts that Power Weather Forecasting from the Northeast’s Highest Peak

Deadline Driven: The 12-Hour Shifts that Power Weather Forecasting from the Northeast's Highest Peak By Wendy Almeida  As a new member of the Mount Washington Observatory team, I wanted to gain a deeper understanding

Find Older Posts