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2006-02-20 22:31:50.000 – Tim Markle,  Chief Observer

Working Overtime

Conditions have become more “seasonable” atop the summit. The fog continues to hold on, howver, and occasionally there are a few snow showers. Temperatures have rebounded to near zero degrees, but still just below zero. This has been the longest stretch of below zero weather that has graced the summit in the past two years. It is amazing just how warm -5 to -10 can feel after being outside in a -30 degree chill!

The snow showers have been few and far between. In fact, the summit is running a 30 inch snowfall deficit for the month of February. Unfortunately, it looks like a dry weather pattern is in store for the remainder of the week. There is a chance for some light snow over the weekend and into early next week, but not the big storm we need to put a dent in the below average monthly snow total.

The picture included is of our wind charts during the last winds event. The recorder got quite a workout on those three days. The interesting thing to note as that we recorded a wind gust of over 110mph for all three days. That is something I have never seen in the three years I have been here!

Thanks to the generous support from our friends at Attitash, the Mount Washington Observatory’s Weather Discovery Center, located on Main Street in North Conway Village will be open to the public from 10am to 5pm every day for the next two weeks. Admission is free, so be sure to visit us during this vacation period. At 11:15am and 2:15pm every day there will also be a showing of “Live From the Rockpile,” a live video-feed to the summit where you can see first-hand what it is like for the observers to live and work atop New England’s highest peak during the harsh winter months.

 

Tim Markle,  Chief Observer

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