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2011-02-25 13:10:50.000 – Stacey Kawecki,  Observer and Meteorologist

Al enjoying sunrise yesterday

One quick look at the calendar had me gasping for breath! February is almost over! Where did all the time go? (According to the Tralfamadorians, all time has always existed and will always exist, so they’re probably not the right ones to ask). However, it does seem like only yesterday we were having our big New Year’s Eve event. Now March looms upon the horizon. That means April is just around the corner, and May is entirely too close for comfort.

Even though, through my somewhat circuitous and delusional reasoning, summer is imminent, winter is still in full force on the summit of Mount Washington. Snow is falling and the wind is starting to pick up. The southeast winds have already started to blow snow into the tower and will continue until winds shift to the northwest later this afternoon. Once that happens a little tower snow isn’t going to compare to the whipping snow that will persist outside the cozy comfort of the Sherman Adams building. High pressure will build from the west as the low pushes into the Canadian Maritimes making for a windy night tonight. It’s also going to get pretty cold, with temperatures diving into the negative teens overnight.

That’s Mount Washington for you – cold and windy! Though it doesn’t look like we’ll see winds in excess of 100 mph, we crazy weather geeks will be crossing our fingers for it tonight!

 

Stacey Kawecki,  Observer and Meteorologist

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