Spring (Skiing) is in the Air!

2015-03-26 16:58:12.000 – Mike Dorfman, Weather Observer/IT Specialist

 

While this winter was slow to start, it seems to be the gift that doesn’t stop giving. The higher summits have seen an impressively long span of below-freezing temperatures, allowing for minimal melting in our snow pack as well as plenty of snowfall! Coverage at resorts across the state is doing quite well with the deepest base depths reaching over 5 feet!

Taking a look at the natural snow across the state, it’s no wonder the base depths are so deep! Natural snow depths are still hovering between 1-3 FEET for most of the state! Even after today’s (mostly) rain event, the southern half of the state will see some melting, but the little melting that will occur will be barely noticeable in our impressive snow pack and the northern half of the state will barely see any melting whatsoever. Even better, there is a swath of snow on the backside of the storm that will spread in through the center of the state, giving us a 20-40 percent chance of dropping 6 inches or more in the next 48 hours!

Snow melt over the next 24 hours.Snow melt over the next 24 hours. Source: http://www.weather.gov/nerfc/snow
 
 
Snow depth in New England.Snow depth in New England. Source: http://www.weather.gov/nerfc/snow
 
Don’t be discouraged by the warmer weather moving through the region today, we’re looking to dip back below the freezing mark, getting some snow on the backside of this storm. The weekend is looking perfect for skiing with temperatures in the 30s for the southern two thirds of the state both Saturday and Sunday. Looking a little further out, it doesn’t look like we’ll be getting any dramatic melt-out events through the end of the week. While temperatures may feel spring-like compared to what we’ve been getting this winter, this is arguably the best time of the year to hit the slopes! Time to get your tan on!

 

Mike Dorfman, Weather Observer/IT Specialist

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