Summer, Then Back to Winter

2015-04-02 16:59:51.000 – Mike Carmon, Interim Director of Summit Operations

 

With the spring season in full swing, those infamous April showers are to be expected, and the next few days will be no exception to that. However, glimpses of winter will continue to nose their way into the forecast from time to time.

A strong warm front will approach the region tonight, ushering in some of the mildest air the region has experienced since the turn of the new year! High temperatures soaring into the upper 50s are likely as far north as the Berlin/Gorham area on Friday, with readings well into the 60s throughout southern New Hampshire. Along with these warmer temperatures, rain will overspread the area, lasting through the early part of Friday, with even the summit of Mt. Washington experiencing plain rain for a time! 

In fact, the above-freezing temperatures we’re expecting overnight tonight on the summit will be the first since early January!  

However, this summer preview will not last long, as an area of low pressure off the coast rapidly deepens and pushes a strong cold front through New England. This will bring an abrupt end to those relatively-balmy temperatures, prompting precipitation to change back to snow on the summit as the mercury tumbles back into the sub-zero realm. If the low sets up just right, a significant amount of snow could be seen on the higher summits by late Saturday. 

Even though summer keeps assuring us that it’s on the way, winter just won’t let go!
 

 

Mike Carmon, Interim Director of Summit Operations

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