Taylor Anemometer

2008-05-10 17:27:26.000 – Steve Welsh,  IT Observer

Conference Room

Now that warmer temperatures have arrived we are starting to test out the summer weather instruments in anticipation of placing yet more strange devices on the tower. The picture, to the right, shows the current state of our conference room after Brian and I took the Taylor heated rotor anemometer apart earlier today. This is a rugged wind speed and wind direction measuring instrument that has not seen use for quite some time now after one of the rotors, lower left in the picture, was damaged. After several hours experimenting we can now run the heaters and simulate wind speed pulses on the oscilloscope. Tomorrow we are planning to attach it to a field point unit up in the tower then, all being well, attempt to log some data to the database – should be interesting.

We have also started working on building a new pitot anemometer, to replace the existing one, which has been in continuous use for several years now. The static pitot anemometer is our main year round wind speed measuring instrument. It is a custom made device similar in concept to what you’d fine on the wing, or fuselage, of a plane to measure its airspeed.

And if this isn’t enough we are also assembling an electric field meter. This instrument should eventually give us prior warning of approaching electrical storms. Its been a busy week so far.

As a side note we also saw several Cog trains today, the first this shift has seen this year. Looks like summer is coming!

 

Steve Welsh,  IT Observer

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