The Highs and Lows of Winter

2015-01-19 13:59:09.000 – Kaitlyn O’Brien, Weather Observer/Education Specialist

 

It seems that ever since the Christmastime melt-out, this winter season has been a disappointing one. Where is all the snow? Why was yesterday’s event mostly ice instead of that highly desirable fresh powder? While snow was seen on the higher summits across the state, much of the lower elevations in addition to the southern half of the state saw a wintry mix of freezing rain and rain. We have a stout warm front to blame for that; the temperatures were simply not cold enough to support snow across the entire region.
 
But don’t lose hope just yet! Looking ahead, models are showing a bit of a lull in the winter weather for New England through the rest of this week. While there are signs of a weak storm developing off the Mid-Atlantic coast Wednesday night into Thursday, the current track is well out to sea, and will likely have a minimal effect on us. However, it is too early in the game to say for sure! At this time, we will continue to monitor the model updates to see where exactly that area of low pressure will steer.
 
 
GFS model Thursday 1AMThursday Jan 22 1AM: An area of low pressure is seen developing off the Mid-Atlantic coast, but tracking well out to sea. Image courtesy of the University of Washington, Department of Atmospheric Science
 
 
GFS model Thursday 7AMThursday Jan 22 7AM: The area of low pressure strengthens, but still keeps a distance from the shoreline. Image courtesy of the University of Washington, Department of Atmospheric Science
 
 
 What could be more promising, however, is a weak clipper that looks to cut across New England during the middle of next weekend. It may be weak, but there is potential. Once again, it’s still 5 days away, but as we get closer to the event, the models will improve, and there will be higher confidence regarding the potential impacts for New England.
 
GFS model Saturday 1PMSaturday Jan 24 1PM: The circled area shows the clipper, which has potential. Image courtesy of the University of Washington, Department of Atmospheric Science
 

In the meantime, an area of high pressure will dominate this week, providing fair skies and pleasant conditions. After all, you can’t have the lows without the highs!

 

Kaitlyn O’Brien, Weather Observer/Education Specialist

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