Touring the Observatory

2012-08-27 19:20:27.000 – Cyrena Briede,  Director of Summit Operations

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One of my favorite parts of this job so far has been the ability to give tours to our visiting Observatory Members. Whether your interest in Mount Washington is the history, the weather, or even Marty the cat, it’s a real treat for me to meet the people who support us and support what we do. Often they are just as excited about being up here as we are, and it’s great to see that enthusiasm from them. It doesn’t matter if they are visiting for the first time or the sixth time, if they are 8 years old or 80, the excitement in their eyes is the same.

On Friday I had the privilege of giving a few tours and got to meet some great people, like Ken who gets just as excited about the weather as we do. As a science teacher for his granddaughters, he brought them and a few other family members up to see the science we practice at the Observatory. I was also able to meet Robert, an aspiring meteorologist, who got to see what our observers do and where they live during their shift. Maybe we will see him up here again in the future as an intern or meteorologist!

So if you plan on visiting the Observatory, I highly encourage you to become a member and take a tour. You’ll get to see our weather wall full of charts, instruments, and data, as well as where the observers live and play. If you don’t have a fear of heights, you can even climb into the parapet tower and be the highest person on Mount Washington. So become a member and come visit us today!

 

Cyrena Briede,  Director of Summit Operations

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