Truck or Snow Cat

2012-04-05 17:12:33.000 – Steve Welsh,  Weather Observer/IT Specialist

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Today has been a typical winter’s day up here with temperatures hovering around 10 Fahrenheit, winds gusting between 50 and 70 mph, up-slope snow showers, blowing snow and freezing fog with accompanying rime ice. At times we could see two to three hundred feet, however, these times didn’t last long before the fog closed in and restricted our view to 100 feet or less. Tomorrow looks a little better as we may possibly, maybe, perhaps see a few breaks in the fog.

It’s certainly been quite a change from yesterday when, under clear blue skies, we managed to do our weekly shift change in the 4×4 van equipped with chains. For the first time this year we did not require the use of the Snow Cat for any part of the trip. In the past few years it’s been late April to early May before we have managed this feat. I wonder if we’ll be able to do a repeat next Wednesday?

 

Steve Welsh,  Weather Observer/IT Specialist

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