Winter is just around the corner.

2011-08-23 15:45:01.000 – Brian Clark,  Weather Observer/Education Specialist

The descent has begun. By that, I mean the descent into winter! Ok, so maybe it’s a little early to be talking about winter considering we haven’t even really hit fall yet, but I have to admit it’s been on my mind a lot this week. Waking up this morning to temperatures in the mid 30’s made me think about it even more.

The descent I am talking about though more specifically refers to the fact that, nearly two weeks ago, we reached our peak for the year as far as average daily high temperatures are concerned. An average daily high is calculated by taking the maximum temperature recorded for the day, adding the minimum temperatures for the day, and dividing by two. So for example, yesterday’s maximum was 48, and the minimum was 37, making for an average daily temperature of 43 degrees. This can then be compared to the average daily temperature for yesterday, which is 47 degrees, and it can then be said that yesterday’s temperature was 4 degrees below average.

So starting August 12th, when the average daily high fell from 49 to 48, we will see a decrease in these average daily highs all the way into January. In fact, the lowest average daily temperature of the year, 4 degrees, will occur on January 24th. Between now and then, there’s lots more transition to happen. In fact, when I return for my next shift, we will already be in the month of the year that we typically see our first measurable snowfall!

Observers Footnote: Since the summit staff has received a few calls and emails about the reported earthquake in VA, we would like to go on record that we (nor any of the other various staff or visitors), did NOT feel anything on the summit. But it was reported as being felt as far north as Bar Harbor. If you did feel it, you can go to the “Felt It Map” and fill out a Felt It survey to be part of the archive survey. It’s quick, free, easy, and great for research into earthquakes like this.

 

Brian Clark,  Weather Observer/Education Specialist

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