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Windswept2024-04-29T14:35:07-04:00

Windswept Online

Bulletin of the Mount Washington Observatory

Windswept is published three times a year, featuring updates about the Observatory’s work and stories about the mountain’s weather, personalities, news, and special events. Find a selection of recent articles and past editions below. You can receive Windswept in print by becoming a member of Mount Washington Observatory.

Avalanche Deaths a Tragic Part of Mount Washington History

Avalanche Deaths a Tragic Part of Mount Washington History By Peter Crane, Curator, Gladys Brooks Memorial Library | June 15, 2021 Mount Washington and Ammonoosuc Ravine (looking from the west). The large dot marks the approximate site of the Forgays tragedy. Bradford Washburn photo. On Monday February 1, 2021, an avalanche in Ammonoosuc Ravine took the life of Ian Forgays, 54, of Lincoln, Vermont. Forgays, a very experienced backcountry skier, was skiing alone in this ravine on the western side of Mount Washington. Weather conditions were favorable with the temperature in the single numbers and teens and winds averaging

Visibility from Summit Increasing Over Time

Visibility from Summit Increasing Over Time By Brian Fitzgerald, Director of Science & Education | June 15, 2021  Weather Observer Sam Robinson stands above the clouds in December 2020. Observers record prevailing visibility at each of their 24 hourly observations, every day of the year. Visibility appears to be generally increasing over time on the summit of Mount Washington since our continuous record of visibility began in 1943. This noteworthy finding comes in the wake of an initial data exploration and analysis of Mount Washington Observatory’s (MWO) long-term visibility records, completed by Weather Observers Jay Broccolo and Sam

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